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Nearly 70 people were killed in Cameroon when the separatists stopped a week of young people



Renewed clashes killed 69 people in Cameroon's English-speaking regions, where armed separatists ordered people to stay in their homes when the country is preparing to celebrate the national day of youth.

February 11 coincides with the plebiscite of 1961, which the separatists marked as the day when the English-speaking territory was handed over to the French-speaking majority.

Patients get up and screamed on the ground and receive little medical help at the Saint Mary Clinic, a private hospital in the Cameroon coastal town of Limbe that speaks English. Nurse Frederick Mengoli says that the Cameroon army left them on Friday morning.

"Today, the army brought 11 wounded patients and we can not worry about them because our staff is not present and we do not have the necessary medicines for their care," Mengoli said. "We'll just clean their wounds. This is a very serious situation."

The battle has taken place since February 5 in the Anglo-Saxon southwestern cities of Limba, Buea, Mutengena, Kumba, Mamfa and Tombel, as well as in the northwestern towns of Bamenda, Kumbo, Ndop, Nkambe, Bafut and Kom. At that time, armed separatists began what they call a 10-day closure banning numerous activities in the war-torn Anglo-Saxon regions by 14 February.

They say that the purpose of the ban is to interrupt the activities of the National Youth Day celebrated on 11 February.

The abandoned English-speaking city of Buea, 6 February 2019 (E. Kindzeka / VOA)

The abandoned English-speaking city of Buea, 6 February 2019 (E. Kindzeka / VOA)

Here, in Buei, hundreds of students from a city university are called when they return home after being forcefully removed by the army from their homes and locked for several hours. The army said that they stayed home, followed the separatists, instead of adhering to government instructions to continue their activities.

Edmond Mbella, a 19-year-old student of journalism, says that they can not continue their studies because separatists threaten their lives.

"Well-armed soldiers are well trained, but with thought-out weapons they are killed, but they are [the government] We want to get out. We will not, "said Mbella." Who can protect us when soldiers do not protect themselves? "

Some students have remained in custody. The government says at least six military, 47 armed separatists and 16 civilians were killed. Separatists say a number of soldiers have been killed in social media, according to the government.

Deben Tchoffo, Governor of the English-speaking north-western Cameroon region of Bamenda, 6 February 2019. (E. Kindzeka / VOA)

Deben Tchoffo, Governor of the English-speaking north-western Cameroon region of Bamenda, 6 February 2019. (E. Kindzeka / VOA)

Deben Tchoffo, the governor of the English-speaking northwestern region, says that soldiers will continue to attack and kill armed fighters who are disturbed by public peace.

"Those who will continue to challenge the country, our security and even more population will be treated appropriately. The fastest situation in our region will again normalize., "Said Tchoffo.

Cameroon celebrates the youth day every year to encourage young people to abandon violence and other negative behaviors.

Bamenda Square remains closed, Bamenda, February 6, 2019 (E. Kindzeka / VOA)

Bamenda Square remains closed, Bamenda, February 6, 2019 (E. Kindzeka / VOA)

On February 11, it was chosen because it coincided with the day of 1961, when the United Nations organized a plebiscite in the southern and northern parts of Britain's confidential territory in Cameroon.

The northern part voted in favor of independence when he joined the Federal Republic of Nigeria, while the southern part, now known as Cameroon's English-speaking regions, voted in favor of independence when he joined French-speaking Cameroon.

Since then, English-speaking cameramen have complained that the plebiscite sponsored by U.N. has not given the third option: to have an independent state.

This led to an armed rebellion that began in the English-speaking regions in November 2017, after separatists proclaimed the independence of the nation, dubbed "Ambazonia" when they complained that the English-speaking anglophones were mostly French-speaking.


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