Saturday , February 27 2021

Patients are separated from noisy hospitals



Patient patients are early out of hospital due to noise.

According to new research, noise and sounds in hospitals are regularly exceeding international recommendations.

This is a common concern among patients, families and staff, says the study.

The study showed that noise at night or disturbed noise in four out of 10 (40%) patients.

Noise disorders are even detected in intensive care departments.

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The editorial board of the BMJ medical journal claims that the problem is getting worse

Lead author dr. Andreas Xyrichis said: "Even in the intensive care departments that take care of the most vulnerable patients, we measured noise above 100 dB, which is equal to loud music through the headphones."

Noise in hospitals also hampers communication between employees, causes disorders, irritation and fatigue, which adversely affects the quality and safety of health care.

High levels of noise and noise caused by stress can adversely affect the performance and well-being of employees, which endangers behavior and contributes to combustion, they said.

Dr. Xyrichis added: "We know that hospital noise has disruptive effects on sleeping – in particular, the sound of the motor has a greater negative effect on excitement than people.

"The rehabilitation of post-hospitalization is also undermined.

"For example, patients with coronary care who were treated in a noisy period had a greater incidence of re-hospitalization compared to those who were treated in quieter periods."

Patients who have to stay at the hospital several nights have been reported to feel caught and stressed, leading to early spill requirements and an increased risk of trauma and readmission.

Researchers said that methods for measuring perceptions of patients were limited to this point and therefore more research is needed in this area.

Alarms, TVs, handhelds and ringtones and staff, visitors and talk with patients are only a small potential source of noise in hospitals.

All patients do not detect all of the sounds as noise noise – for example, some find the sound of trolleys that connect it to a hot drink.

Dr. Xyrichis said: "Measures to address this problem included earbuds, noise warning systems, acoustic panels, educational initiatives and noise reduction protocols that brought some benefits.

"However, until now, patients have been treated as passive recipients of hospital noise and not active participants in its emergence.

"It is essential that future solutions need greater involvement of patients as a key feature.

"Guides on potential hospitals in hospitals can also improve understanding of patient environments and increase relaxation.

"Sound masking – adding backgrounds, broadband sound optimized for individual noise reduction environments – has been widely used in open offices for many years and has recently demonstrated the promise of improving sleep in hospitals."


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