A six-year-old brave battle with Dementia was saved by a younger sister, 3, from the same fate



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A six-year girlish brave battle with dementia saved her three-year-old sister from the same fate.

Nicole Rich and her sister Jessica have both Batten's disease – a genetic disease that does not have a known drug and is not available for treatment at the NHS.

    Sisters Jessica (left), three and Nicole (right), six, have both Batten's disease

SWNS: South West News Service

Sisters Jessica (left), three and Nicole (right), six, have both Batten's disease

When Nicolu was diagnosed two years ago, it was too late for doctors to stop the most devastating symptoms of the disease.

But while she can no longer eat herself, she goes herself and never speaks, her bubble sister does not show any external signs of illness.

Jessica, from Newcastle, was only one of her sister's diagnosis – and triggered tests that caught the disease before they could rob her abilities.

The battle for her treatment has made her younger sister a place in revolutionary cognitive treatment, which seems to be a trick.

    Gail and Matthew Rich with their daughters Nicole (on his father's lap) and Jessica

SWNS: South West News Service

Gail and Matthew Rich with their daughters Nicole (on his father's lap) and Jessica
    Jessica, right, she was just one of her sister's diagnosis

SWNS: South West News Service

Jessica, right, she was just one of her sister's diagnosis
    Jessica, left, pulls her sister's face and brings her toys

SWNS: South West News Service

Jessica, left, pulls her sister's face and brings her toys

Proud parents Gail and Matthew look with stunning pride when Jessica washed on her sister, holding her hand, biting her face and bringing her toys.

But as far as Nicole is concerned, Nicole's diagnosis and treatment battle, which is currently not available at the NHS, gave her the best chance.

An inseparable pair sits on the edge, hand in hand, for injection, injected directly into the brain, during twice-monthly appointments of GOSH.

Her mother, Gail, 41, is camping with the Batten Disease Family Society, which will be available in the United Kingdom.

    Nicole, on the picture, can not walk alone or talk

SWNS: South West News Service

Nicole, on the picture, can not walk alone or talk
    The family is campaigning with the Batten Disease Family Society, which will be available in the United Kingdom

SWNS: South West News Service

The family is campaigning with the Batten Disease Family Society, which will be available in the United Kingdom
    Jessica, right, and she helps Nicole, left

SWNS: South West News Service

Jessica, right, and she helps Nicole, left

Mum-of-three Gail, from Newcastle, said that her heart sank when she found out that there was no healing.

She said: "Our world has collapsed in these few seconds. We cried and cried and cried."

But she is so proud because her daughter Nicole saved her younger sister.

She added: "Nicole rescued Jessica – that's what many have said many times to us.

"If there was no Nicole, no one would know about Jessica until it was too late.

"We always thought Jessica would do things for Nicole – and she's doing it.

"But if it were not for Nicole, it would have been – all these years in a row – that Jessica would begin to show symptoms.

"They have this amazing bond. They only know what's really going on, really.

"Jessica's life saved this unique bond and strong and gives me hope.

"In her own way, Nicole diagnosed Jessica and gave her some options she did not have.

"She can not walk alone or talk, but change the lives of people. She brings the best in people.

"And Jessica is like her mother's big sister.

"If she coughs, she will burn her back, hold her hand when they are together and lead her around, slowly helping her and cursing her and poking her face.

"She is so beautiful. Of course she does not fully understand – but she knows that they have a bond and that gives us hope."

Batten's disease is caused by abnormal genes that can not produce the protein needed by the body.

A rare disorder eventually causes patients to lose vision, the ability to walk and cause dementia, and usually can not be expected to endure living in their teenage years.


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