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The questions arose whether the red flags had been missed before the child died on the West Bank



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The care for the child's well-being was marked by Orango Tamariki and the police before the alleged kidnapping of the boy, say sources close to his family.

The matter raises questions as to whether agencies could do more to prevent the death of a 10-month-old boy on the west coast.

It seems that Oranga Tamariki is under strict supervision of the raising of children.

A source close to the family said that they felt that the concerns they raised with the police were not seriously addressed.

Things

A source close to the family said that they felt that the concerns they raised with the police were not seriously addressed.

The infant was rushed to the hospital after a severe head injuries in Hokitika's home where he lived with his 30-year-old father and his older brother on Tuesday. He died the next day at Christchurch Hospital.

A 30-year-old man who has an interim suppression of the name paid yesterday when he was charged with murdering his son on Wednesday in a Christchurch district court.

He was detained in custody without a reference to the lawsuit and on 30 July he is scheduled to appear at the main civil court in Greymouth.

Both the husband and the mother separated and did not live together. It is understood that he had custody of the child.

People who are close to the child – neighbors and family – have said Things they had concerns about the child's well-being, reported to the police and Oranga Tamariki in weeks and months before the alleged murder.

It is understood that Oranga Tamariki told his family that everything seemed good in the weeks before the child's death.

There are questions about what measures, if any, were taken by the police in response to calls for a child's well-being. A source close to the family said that they felt that the concerns they raised were not taken seriously.

Oranga Tamariki and the police did not say whether they had any worries about the child before they died.

The head of the Tasman District Police District, inspector Gini Welch, said: "While an investigation into the murder is taking place, and although the matter is before the courts, we can not provide any further details on these investigations."

Oranga Tamariki Services for Children and Families Regional Director of the Upper Southern Island, Kaye McDonald, said that the death of the child was "tragedy" and their thoughts were with the affected whānau.

"Our staff comes every day to work that is determined to protect children and young people from harm.

"We will provide the police with all the necessary assistance."

McDonald said she can no longer comment because she cites reasons for privacy and a regular police investigation.

Children raised by social workers from their parents and taken care of them were highlighted by the announcement that she wanted to raise a baby from the Hawke's Bay hospital in May. As regards the issues raised by the EU, four inquiries were announced News the video story of the website, which has taken multiple attempts by social workers, with the police to take the child from their mother's arms.

A woman who was a friend of the accused murderer said earlier that she told her partner that the child had fallen off the bed and broke the skull.

"I feel [him]. He loved the baby, "she said.

The neighbor and friend of a man said that "the heart was broken".

"It's too close to home," she said.

On average, every year, nine children aged 14 and under die in suspicious circumstances in New Zealand.

Death on the west coast brings the year 2019 to nine. This number includes two children shot dead in a terrorist attack in Christchurch.

Data collected for The murder report, a Things the investigation shows that each eighth victim of the murder in New Zealand from 2004 to 31 March 2019 was a child.

Of the cases where the killer's relationship with the victim was known, there were 27 percent of mothers, 24 percent of fathers and 17 percent of de facto fathers.

More than two thirds of the victims were two years old or less.

The most common cause of death was damage by force, often due to shaking. Almost half of the children happened in 20 percent of the most endangered neighborhoods. The children of māori were too overrepresented among the victims.

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