Moon-Bound Israeli Spacecraft Snaps stunning photos and videos from the trip



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SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) published on Sunday numerous stunning images and short videos shot by the Israeli harbor lunar Beresheet at various stages during the journey to the moon.

One photo showed the Earth at a distance of 131,000 km. The longest was 265,000 km from the planet. The first "selfie" image of the spacecraft showed the Earth at a distance of 37,600 km and was released on March 5th.

Photo of the Earth, taken by Beresheet at a distance of 265,000 km. Photos via SpaceIL and IAI

Photo of the Earth, taken by Beresheet at a distance of 265,000 km. Photos via SpaceIL and IAI

A 19-second clip released on Sunday showed the sunrise from the perspective of a spacecraft.

"The video can see the Earth that hides the sun from the spacecraft and then leaves the same shadow that the Earth has created and exposure to the sun," said IAI and SpaceIL.

The second short video showed the use of the landing space.

Beresheet, whose name in Hebrew means "At Beginning / Genesis", began successfully in Cape Canaveral, Florida on Friday, February 22, 2019 at 3:45 am in Israel.

If Beresheet completes his lunar mission on April 11, Israel will join the super power of China, Russia and the United States when landing a spacecraft on the moon.

Photo of the Earth, taken by Beresheet at a distance of 131,000 km. Photos via SpaceIL and IAI

Photo of the Earth, taken by Beresheet at a distance of 131,000 km. Photos via SpaceIL and IAI

Last week, the SpaceIL and IAI engineering teams accompanying the voyage from a control room in the central Israeli city of Yehud said that Beresheet has so far performed three key maneuvers to achieve higher altitudes, including the one that coordinates the space vessel. "On the right path to the moon."

Control room IAI and SpaceIL for Beresheet in Yehuda, Israel. Photo: Eliran Avital

Control room IAI and SpaceIL for Beresheet in Yehuda, Israel. Photo: Eliran Avital

"In contrast to previous maneuvers in which we accelerated the speed of the spacecraft to increase our orbit, in this maneuver, the plane of the orbits changed to slightly tilt as and to ensure that the spacecraft reaches the lunar orbit exactly at the right time and time, "Yoav Landsman, Senior Inspector at SpaceIL, explained then.

During the maneuver, Beresheet's main engine was activated for 60 seconds and the engineering teams said they were satisfied with the operation of the lunar vessel systems.

Launch of the Beresheet spacecraft on the SpaceX Falcon 9 on February 22, 2019. Photo via SpaceIL and IAI

Launch of Beresheet spacecraft on SpaceX on February 22, 2019. Photo via SpaceIL and IAI

Beresheet is the smallest spacecraft ever sent to the moon. This is about the size of a washing machine that reaches a height of 1.5 meters, about two meters wide and weighs only 600 kilograms.

Almost everything about unmanned spacecraft is contrary to conventions and shows Israeli ingenuity in the best way.

Beresheet began as a dream of three young engineers and not a government program, making it the first privately funded space probe for hunting. For planning and development it cost only $ 100 million, while other space missions in the past operated in billions of dollars.

"It was very difficult to raise money for this mission because it was a truly impossible mission," said South African-Israel philanthropist Morris Kahn, chairman of SpaceIL, before the start. "I did not realize that this was impossible, and the three engineers who started the project did not realize that this was impossible, and, as in Israel, we think that nothing is impossible. We hope to dream. And we are really realizing this dream."

The design of the craft has changed from the beginning of 2011 to twice as long as the last dress did not end last year.

Space Space SpaceShip was originally designed to meet the regulations set by the now inactive competition for the Google Lunar X Award, an international competition that called on world engineers to create and send the first private harbor on the Moon. The SpaceIL team decided to continue the mission – either with money or without money – and retaining the smallest possible dimension of its lunar vessel and with as little redundancy as possible.

A multidisciplinary team comprised of about 250 engineers, scientists and computer scientists from the non-profit SpaceIL and the State-owned Israeli Space Industry (IAI), has developed, developed and developed Beresheet. The actual construction of a spacecraft from its entire development lasted only four years.

Read more about SpaceIL and Beresheet's route before the beginning of the moon.

This report was made by Viva Sarah Press.

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